Reduce PPC Ad Budgets with Timing based ads

At our web site agency LaDezign.com, we’ve been working on a “4 Dimension” roadmap to online success. We put every web project – whether it’s an ecommerce web store, an SEO client or a web site design project – through this 4 step strategy which we call Define, Design, Deploy, Deliver.

The entire thrust of this “4-D” process is to maximize results at the most efficient level of ROI.

Here’s an example that explains this process using the prism of PPC advertising. The challenge: how do we define a targeted PPC strategy, that will include high converting and well designed landing pages, which can be deployed quickly and adjusted quickly and on a platform that enables us to rapidly measure results and deliver a high value to customers. So the starting point to this challenge is identifying our targeted audience because we need to deliver our advertising message to a prospect that is likely to become a customer. Once we figure out our audience, then we need to identify where he “shops”, where he “browses” and what times he does these things.

Once you see this process coming to life it leads you to a strategy related to PPC optimization that is more colloquially known as Dayparting. If you are doing search engine optimization, you most likely are also spending money on PPC ads. There is a strategy of PPC advertising called “Dayparting” which is a popular way to make your pay-per-click dollars work smarter.

With Dayparting you dictate when ads are delivered time and day. This means you as the advertiser can turn off paid advertising during periods of low or poor conversion and turn your ads back on during times when conversions are best. If you are measuring your conversions you should expect to see a nice boost in your ROI because it means you are flashing your wares at times when customers are most likely to convert.

How To set up Dayparting PPC Periods:

1. Compare ad delivery times to your targeted customer demographic habits. You will need to know who you are targeting, what they search for and what they actually buy (as opposed to just window shop). Install Google analytics so you can compare visits to interactions and get a more realistic idea of your customer behavior.

2. Adjust your ads so that they display during high conversion time slots. So if conversions spike during lunch breaks, then set your ads to display during those times.

3. Track Results and do it again Again, your analytics software will help you figure out the best roadmap to efficient ROI results. How to do this with Google AdWords (you can find info on Microsoft separately):

  • Pick YOUR time zone to target.
  • Click the Edit Campaign Settings link in your account admin area
  • Turn on “ad scheduling”
  • Pick the days and times to run the ads (Use “Bulk Edit” to set multiple time periods)

Kontera vs AdSense. A new way to monetize your site content.

I received this email today from Ian Traynor about Kontera, a novel way of monetizing content-oriented websites. I haven’t yet tested it on our web design clients, but it seems very interesting at first glance especially if you are looking for PPC revenues or cost reductions. Unlike Google’s AdSense program, which places highly visual advertisements (ie. adverts) on your web pages, Kontera scans the words on a web page and, if it finds a word which one of its advertisers has bid for, it hyperlinks the word with a double underline. When the website visitor hovers over the word, a small popup appears next to the word with the a.dvert.

If the visitor then cl.icks on the a.d, the website owner gets a small commission.

In the past Google’s Terms of Service (“TOS”) would not allow you to use this type of contextual a.dvertising on the same page that you were running AdSense. However, the TOS has now been changed so it is “legal” to run both types of a.dverts.

Optimizing PPC budgets driving through a windshield

When reviewing your web site design performance, part of the challenge with evaluating your search marketing performance is analyzing where traffic is coming from to see the results it is producing. With the economy forcing budgets into downward spirals, you need to minimize your PPC spend and maximize revenues from the clicks that come in. When optimizing your PPC ads for maximum performance, sometimes you have to pretend you are driving a car and looking through the windshield of the car in front of you. What this means is that instead of focusing purely on high click through rates so that you have a strong CTR with Google, you may need to focus on your actual conversion rates (this means the people that click through who also fill out a form to take an action on your site). If your conversions are HIGH, then you can be confident your click throughs will be fine too. Remember, without conversions you won’t have any money to pay for more clicks. So focus on the scoreboard, not your rushing yardage.

An optimal way to make a meaningful impact conversion rates is to use the ad copy – though it is just a few words basically – to let the customer know before they click, what they should expect to see on the other side. Tease them, reveal a few things, but don’t pull off a surprise effect which leaves them stumbling and looking for that exit sign. Bottom line is to deliver the message even before they reach your site.

What choices are in your arsenal of delivering pre-expectation ad copy? Price, Urgency and Value.

With regards to price – ie. discounts – you will likely have more clicks (thus increasing your CTR) but your conversions are at risk if the clickers are not yet in purchase mode. It sucks to pay search engines for research oriented clicks. So what you can do is to focus instead of terminology that is more closely related to a prospect who is in PURCHASING mode.

The simplest method is to create urgency by using time or number of openings available.
– One example is a sale date. For example, “Sale Ends Nov. 1st, Order now. use code #1234x”
– Another example is to use competition in the form of “10 left at this price. sale ends today. Free Shipping!”

How to reduce your traffic budget for Pay per click or PPC

It used to be that clicks could be purchased for pennies per click. Even with the insanely high fraud rates of 30-40%, it still was worth it to buy as much traffic as you could afford. In the last few years, the costs have skyrocketed. And as more people become web savvy, the competition for those elusive top sponsored ads, becomes even more acute and thus the prices go up another notch.

When I began helping other clients develop their own 4 Pillar Internet Success strategies, I used to focus mostly on search engines. The traffic from them was basically free and therefore it made a lot of sense on how to dominate on free search engines. The funny thing is that as their rankings increased their traffic increased but their conversions did not move in sync. And the reason that made the most sense was the PPC ads on the top and right of Google for example. The heat map studies show that 7x as many people click on the free search engine rankings results as people who click on the ads.

That’s great if you have good rankings. Problem is that people tend to forget that 1 out of 7 people still click on Sponsored ads. So if you are willing to give away 14% or so of your business opportunities to your competition, then you can ignore PPC. But, if you want to take advantage of every business opportunity from a targeted prospect (remember the user typed in the query into the search engine because ostensibly he or she is looking for your service) then you need to buy sponsored PPC ads. So maybe this is counterintuitive but the point is that as your business grows and your rankings grow, so too will your PPC budget grow because 14% of the traffic will always click on the ADS.

What I intend to cover in this PPC section are strategies, case studies and applications designed to get the most out of your PPC budget.

How to reduce your traffic budget for Pay per Click or PPC

It used to be that clicks could be purchased for pennies per click. Even with the insanely high fraud rates of 30-40%, it still was worth it to buy as much traffic as you could afford. In the last few years, the costs have skyrocketed. And as more people become web savvy, the competition for those elusive top sponsored ads, becomes even more acute and thus the prices go up another notch.

When I began helping other clients develop their own 4 Pillar Internet Success strategies, I used to focus mostly on search engines. The traffic from them was basically free and therefore it made a lot of sense on how to dominate on free search engines. The funny thing is that as their rankings increased their traffic increased but their conversions did not move in sync. And the reason that made the most sense was the PPC ads on the top and right of Google for example. The heat map studies show that 7x as many people click on the free search engine rankings results as people who click on the ads.

That’s great if you have good rankings. Problem is that people tend to forget that 1 out of 7 people still click on Sponsored ads. So if you are willing to give away 14% or so of your business opportunities to your competition, then you can ignore PPC. But, if you want to take advantage of every business opportunity from a targeted prospect (remember the user typed in the query into the search engine because ostensibly he or she is looking for your service) then you need to buy sponsored PPC ads. So maybe this is counterintuitive but the point is that as your business grows and your rankings grow, so too will your PPC budget grow because 14% of the traffic will always click on the ADS.

What I intend to cover in this PPC section are strategies, case studies and applications designed to get the most out of your PPC budget.



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